The Secrets of College Hill

College Hill has the distinction of being Greensboro’s best-preserved nineteenth century neighborhood with narrow streets lined with Queen Anne cottages, charming bungalows, and interwar apartment buildings. Packed with history and centrally located, College Hill blends quaint architecture with city amenities to create one of North Carolina’s most interesting neighborhoods. Unlike many neighborhoods in Greensboro, College…

The Secrets of the Southside Neighborhoods

If you haven’t visited Southside and South Elm Street – south of the railroad tracks – in a few years, my how things have changed. Once the redheaded stepchild of downtown Greensboro, South Elm and Southside are now the envy of cities across the region as historic architecture and walkable streets are coupled with hipster…

Guilford Landmarks May Increase by Four

Four historic landmark designations have been submitted from the Guilford County Historic Preservation Commission for designation to the Greensboro City Council. Each property represents major themes of Greensboro history including education, industry, and architecture. Landmark designation is a voluntary process and is initiated by the property owner. Applicants are responsible for compiling architectural and historical…

Historic Preservation for Improved Social Equity

Historic preservation has served a central role in American history, and over the past 30 years, it held an increasingly relevant role in preserving sites of Black history in Greensboro. Non-profit and non-governmental organizations such as Preservation Greensboro can help to develop approaches to social equity and advocate for public and private funding to raise…

South Elm Building with Interesting History is Designated

On October 15th 2019, the Greensboro City Council designated the Groome-Shevel Building at 532-534 South Elm Street a Guilford County Landmark property. Landmark designation means the community recognizes the property is worthy of preservation because of its special significance in local history. Any substantial changes in design, materials, and appearance to the property is subject…

Greensboro’s Race to the Sky

Greensboro’s earliest buildings rarely soared to dizzying heights due to low market demand and frugal financial capital. Traditional building materials such as wood and brick generally limited construction height to three stories, except for an occasional courthouse cupola or church spire. Early images of Greensboro’s skyline show structures peeking around treetops, with rare architectural features…

Development Fund Looks Back on Anniversary Milestones

Ten years ago, the Preservation Greensboro Development Fund found new footing. Since that time, the Fund has been involved in a series of notable projects ranging from relocating bungalows, rescuing fire-damaged houses, and reviving a nineteenth century saloon.  In doing so, it has forged creative partnerships with neighborhoods, local governments, private foundations, businesses, individuals, and…

52nd Annual Meeting Recognizes Local History, Architecture, and Preservationists

Greensboro’s preservation community gathered on February 7th 2018 to celebrate the past year, and to hear insights on history and architecture by O.Henry Editor Jim Dodson. The group met in a new historical venue – Color Works Meeting Space at Revolution Mill. The meeting was the 52nd Annual Meeting of Preservation Greensboro Incorporated. During a…