Furnishing Blandwood – Changing Taste in Antebellum America, Second of a Two-Part Series

When the New York architect Alexander Jackson Davis in 1844 came to Greensboro and designed what became one of the country’s earliest Tuscan villas, he and his client, the visionary Governor John Motley Morehead, collaborated on furnishing Blandwood’s interior.  The recommendations and selections made by both enterprising men—especially with regard to art and furniture—reflect shifting…

Furnishing Blandwood – Changing Taste in Antebellum America, First of a Two-Part Series

When the New York architect Alexander Jackson Davis in 1844 came to Greensboro and designed what became one of the country’s earliest Tuscan villas, he and his client, the visionary Governor John Motley Morehead, collaborated on furnishing Blandwood’s interior.  The recommendations and selections made by both enterprising men—especially with regard to art and furniture—reflect shifting…

Love-A-Loewenstein Party

Do you love Mid-Century Modernism? Do you love mod parties? Why not enjoy both at our mod party at the Willis House? The 1965 Willis House is significant due to its retention of character-defining architectural features specified by Greensboro architects Loewenstein-Atkinson. Edward Loewenstein and Robert A. Atkinson Jr. led a firm notable for its promotion…

Restore Explore Connect: Furnishing Blandwood: Changing Taste in Antebellum America, Second of a Two-Part Series

When the New York architect Alexander Jackson Davis in 1844 designed what became one of the country’s earliest Tuscan villas, he and his client, the visionary Governor John Motley Morehead, collaborated on various interior details for the enlargement of Blandwood. This is a second part of a two-part series, but participants will enjoy the presentation as a stand-alone event.

Restore Explore Connect: Furnishing Blandwood – Changing Taste in Antebellum America, First of a Two-Part Series

When the New York architect Alexander Jackson Davis in 1844 designed what became one of the country’s earliest Tuscan villas, he and his client, the visionary Governor John Motley Morehead, collaborated on various interior details for the enlargement of Blandwood. The recommendations and selections made by both enterprising men—especially with regard to art and furniture—reflect changing tastes and values in mid-nineteenth century America.