Constructed in 1904, Beasley House Was Home to Family of Eleven!

This vernacular farmhouse-style Beasley House at 706 Fifth Avenue is among the first constructed in the Aycock neighborhood, and has been restored through the efforts of several owners over the past 25 years. Today, the house retains original details that are blended with modern improvements typical of many early Greensboro homes. Harriette and William C. Beasley were…

Two Sisters Constructed This Double House As Income Property

Constructed around 1922 for sisters Minnie and Lillie Wilson, the double house at 675 Percy Street features mirror-image residential units that share a common party wall, and today provides an historic home with urban style. Minnie and Lillie Wilson were never married and enjoying the middle years of their life when they purchased a tract of land on…

Pickett House brought Mid-Century Modern Style to Fisher Park

At first blush, the Mid-Century Modern-style Pickett house stands in contrast to the Colonial and Neoclassical-style homes in the neighborhood, but look beyond the simple lines and low-pitched roof to see how the large windows and exposed woodwork make this home a part of the Fisher Park family. Mary Thelma and William Earle Pickett likely…

The Felder House Breaks Ground in Sustainable Restoration

Carefully restored in 2009, the Felder House at 1115 Virginia Street is the perfect blend of historic craftsmanship and energy efficiency, reminding us that the “greenest” building is the one already built! The Felder House was constructed around 1919 by H. H. Felder, the president of the Felder-Briggs Company menswear store in downtown Greensboro. The Felder…

High Point’s Model Farm Awaits Restoration

The community of Springfield, long ago absorbed into the city of High Point, was a statewide center of Quakerism in the years after the Civil War. The community featured a well-regarded school, and an active ministry that was led by humanitarian Allen Jay. However, it’s most ambitious Reconstruction Era initiatives were made through the establishment…

Early Housing Reforms Sought Innovative Designs

The height of the Great Depression saw the nation’s housing industry mired in high unemployment, tight financing, and poor housing conditions. The average home loan required short terms ranging from three to five years. Reform was necessary to counter the large down payments, second mortgages, and high interest rates that were commonplace. Congress responded to…

Early Greensboro Skyscraper Nominated for Landmark Status

A classic downtown Greensboro skyscraper might earn recognition as a Guilford County Landmark Property at next week’s City Council meeting. The nomination for landmark status has been submitted to Council with a favorable recommendation by the Guilford County Historic Preservation Commission. Popularly known as the Southeastern Building, the (former) American Exchange National Bank Building was…

Courting College Hill; When No Means Yes

A recent project proposed by Edwards Development of Ohio for the Newman and Whitney site (image, right) adjecent to the College Hill Historic District envisions over 700 students housed in a complex of 10 buildings. Neighborhood residents are protesting the plans on grounds that the development will exacerbate parking issues and increase the neighborhood’s population by 50%. Pro-development advocates…